Rescues need a remedy

dog-187817A study came out last year from the Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science listing the most common reasons that people give for surrendering their dogs to shelters.

They list behavior (specifically, biting) at number 10. There is an argument to be made that the percentage of animals relinquished for behavior issues is much higher than this. Continue reading

Advertisements

The Rise of the X-Poo

Several things came across my Facebook feed and showed up on my favorite vicarious veterinary forum this week with a similar theme.

I must conclude that a lot of veterinarians are somewhat irrational breedists.

Cute mutt

Simply full of squee.

Why do we (vets) insist on being breed purists? We aren’t dog show judges. We aren’t dedicated to preserving the genetic purity of any one breed. When we see some admitted mutt with a cute little face we melt and feel happy and gush over how adorable he is. Yet, when presented with a dog that is a putative cross between known breeds, particularly if the cross is given a name, some veterinarians completely lose their shit. Continue reading

“Until one has loved an animal, a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.” ~ Anatole France

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI always thought I would be identically fond of all my pets. As a kid, before I had any furry pets, I was in love with the concept of loving a cat or a dog, having a little best friend to be mine; all mine, not shared with sisters or brothers, as loving and loyal to me as I would be loving and loyal to him. Continue reading

Stuck in the 60’s

There’s an interesting mind set with some clients when it comes to treating animals, a sort of temporal stickiness. Their minds get stuck in time, to when they were kids and how animals were treated “then”.

Most of the time this happens with people from a rural background, and I can understand why. Animals on the farm are regarded as commodities, which most certainly are (thinking cattle, sheep, chickens). You can only put as much money into them as you think you can get out, or you’ll go broke. Continue reading

Everything you ever needed to know about pet food

There are a lot of people with vested interests out there trying to tell you what to feed your pets. Pet store employees and veterinary staff have opinions. Your friends and family have opinions. People at the dog park have opinions. The Internet is full of opinions. Opinions abound and some of them are wrong. Some are downright dangerous. I would like you all to approach the subject of pet food with the same degree of skepticism and critical thinking that you would take to other important topics in your life. Would you change your kid’s school because some mommy at the playground told you her kid’s school was better? Would you ask advice about buying a car from a kid at his first after-school job at a car wash? So why are you taking the advice of your neighbor the unemployed encyclopedia salesman about what to feed your cat? Continue reading

Not the sharpest tool in the shed

After more than 30 years in the veterinary field I have finally come to the realization that I’ve been doing things wrong all this time. I guess I’m a slow learner.

I last wrote an entry on anesthetic-free dental cleaning and how veterinarians are being cast in a very negative light by the proponents of these “procedures”. You can, obviously, read the post yourself. A bit of spleen was vented, and I felt much better afterward. I’m almost over it, I promise.

The other day, though, I had an epiphany. What I finally realized is that it doesn’t matter whether clients follow my advice or not. In fact, it’s absolutely financially more lucrative for me if my clients don’t take my advice on any preventive measures. Better yet, I can stop recommending preventives or screening at all. This would have two huge benefits to me.  Continue reading

Today I’m a tetchy dentist

I’ve been getting feedback on a recent post (The Ten Commandments of Dentalism). Veterinarians saw the humor in it, and the clients who have read the explanation gave generally positive feedback.

Mustache and dog 108 x 148There is, however, a small subset of readers who think that veterinary dentistry is just a way for vets to make money as they sit back and twirl their Snidely Whiplash mustaches. Why would owners spend $500, $600 or more to have the vet “clean the teeth” when it’s obviously something that can just be done by a groomer for $75? What a scam vets are running.  Continue reading